whiskyblender:

Do you know who owns the whisky and bourbon you drink?

Very cool viz.

whiskyblender:

Do you know who owns the whisky and bourbon you drink?

Very cool viz.

(Source: whiskyparty, via flyfishingpodcast)

mcnallyjackson:

If you’ve ever wondered if reading P.G. Wodehouse would be everything you dreamed it could be, it is.

mcnallyjackson:

If you’ve ever wondered if reading P.G. Wodehouse would be everything you dreamed it could be, it is.

bourbonbabe:

In light of yesterday (Oct. 28) being the 94th anniversary of the day Congress passed the Volstead Act over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto, thus beginning Prohibition, here is an interesting fact from Sam K. Cecil’s book, “The Evolution of the Bourbon Whiskey Industry in Kentucky”: Before…

LJ gives #AWBAR a starred review in the 1 November issue. All Saints’ Day, indeed.

*Risen, Clay. American Whiskey, Bourbon & Rye: A Guide to the Nation’s Favorite Spirit. Sterling Epicure. Nov. 2013. 304p. photos. index. ISBN 9781402798405.$24.95.BEVERAGES
New York Times editor Risen (A Nation on Fire: America in the Wake of the King Assassination) deftly combines history and assessment in this informative volume that covers more than 200 of the titular spirits. The introduction discusses regulations that define types of whiskey, the process and ingredients used to make each kind, and the history of production in the United States; it also instructs readers in how to enjoy whiskey, how to organize a tasting, and how to read a whiskey. Risen then tackles particular drinks, including tasting notes, age, proof, price range, and rating for each producer’s brand, along with a high-resolution photograph of the bottle. Descriptors such as lavender, cinnamon, wood, and smoke, among others, will appeal to the reader’s taste, smell, and visual imagination. ­VERDICT This book will delight those interested in learning about the history, traditions, and comparative taste of whiskey, and the gorgeous images will conjure up memories of grandfather’s old favorites. A fascinating read as well as a valuable reference guide, this work is sure to be a hit, especially in regions where the beverage is gaining popularity.—­Ann ­Weber, Bellarmine Coll. Prep., San Jose, CA

LJ gives #AWBAR a starred review in the 1 November issue. All Saints’ Day, indeed.

*Risen, Clay. American Whiskey, Bourbon & Rye: A Guide to the Nation’s Favorite Spirit. Sterling Epicure. Nov. 2013. 304p. photos. index. ISBN 9781402798405.$24.95.BEVERAGES

New York Times editor Risen (A Nation on Fire: America in the Wake of the King Assassination) deftly combines history and assessment in this informative volume that covers more than 200 of the titular spirits. The introduction discusses regulations that define types of whiskey, the process and ingredients used to make each kind, and the history of production in the United States; it also instructs readers in how to enjoy whiskey, how to organize a tasting, and how to read a whiskey. Risen then tackles particular drinks, including tasting notes, age, proof, price range, and rating for each producer’s brand, along with a high-resolution photograph of the bottle. Descriptors such as lavender, cinnamon, wood, and smoke, among others, will appeal to the reader’s taste, smell, and visual imagination. ­VERDICT This book will delight those interested in learning about the history, traditions, and comparative taste of whiskey, and the gorgeous images will conjure up memories of grandfather’s old favorites. A fascinating read as well as a valuable reference guide, this work is sure to be a hit, especially in regions where the beverage is gaining popularity.—­Ann ­Weber, Bellarmine Coll. Prep., San Jose, CA

theatlantic:

The New Science of Old Whiskey

In April 2006, a tornado struck Warehouse C at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky. In the aftermath, the building looked like a diorama: part of the roof and one wall had been artfully removed to reveal the 25,000 barrels stacked inside. Miraculously, not a single one of those barrels was damaged—proof, perhaps, of the Major League manager Leo Durocher’s maxim: God watches over drunks and third basemen.
Repairing the warehouse took several months, and during that time the barrels on the upper floors were exposed to rain, heat, and sun. Mark Brown, Buffalo Trace’s president and CEO, joked at the time that the distillery should sell the whiskey as “tornado-surviving bourbon.”
It turned out to be no joke. The barrels were opened about five years later (the liquor inside had then aged for nine to 11 years) and, says Brown, “the darnedest thing is, when we went to taste the whiskey, it was really good. I mean really good.” The company decided to label the bourbon “tornado surviving,” and aficionados—who also found it superior to the usual product—quickly snapped it up. One went so far as to write Buffalo Trace and ask whether it planned to make more. “Not deliberately,” Brown replied.
Yet the tornado bourbon got the distillers wondering: What are the perfect conditions for storing the barrels in which bourbon ages? It’s a question that no one had really asked before, despite the oft-noticed phenomenon that barrels situated near the windows in warehouses have a tendency to become what managers call “honey barrels”—that is, ones that produce above-average whiskey. Moreover, the storage question was a logical follow-up to one that Buffalo Trace had already been pondering: How do you make a perfect barrel?
Read more. [Image: Buffalo Trace Distillery]


Excellent article in The Atlantic

theatlantic:

The New Science of Old Whiskey

In April 2006, a tornado struck Warehouse C at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky. In the aftermath, the building looked like a diorama: part of the roof and one wall had been artfully removed to reveal the 25,000 barrels stacked inside. Miraculously, not a single one of those barrels was damaged—proof, perhaps, of the Major League manager Leo Durocher’s maxim: God watches over drunks and third basemen.

Repairing the warehouse took several months, and during that time the barrels on the upper floors were exposed to rain, heat, and sun. Mark Brown, Buffalo Trace’s president and CEO, joked at the time that the distillery should sell the whiskey as “tornado-surviving bourbon.”

It turned out to be no joke. The barrels were opened about five years later (the liquor inside had then aged for nine to 11 years) and, says Brown, “the darnedest thing is, when we went to taste the whiskey, it was really good. I mean really good.” The company decided to label the bourbon “tornado surviving,” and aficionados—who also found it superior to the usual product—quickly snapped it up. One went so far as to write Buffalo Trace and ask whether it planned to make more. “Not deliberately,” Brown replied.

Yet the tornado bourbon got the distillers wondering: What are the perfect conditions for storing the barrels in which bourbon ages? It’s a question that no one had really asked before, despite the oft-noticed phenomenon that barrels situated near the windows in warehouses have a tendency to become what managers call “honey barrels”—that is, ones that produce above-average whiskey. Moreover, the storage question was a logical follow-up to one that Buffalo Trace had already been pondering: How do you make a perfect barrel?

Read more. [Image: Buffalo Trace Distillery]

Excellent article in The Atlantic

bourbonbabe:

There’s been a lot of press about “the bourbon boom” over the past few years. Much of it has focused on how many barrels are aging in Kentucky and how many more people are drinking it.

But bourbon production also produces jobs, revenue and tax dollars. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association

nybg:

birdandmoon:

While I work away on some new stuff, and since it’s warbler migration season (!), I thought I’d repost this print I made last year (you can buy it here). I’m a birding fan AND a video game fan. How many can you identify?

Remember to keep office lights off at night so that those migrating birds can pass safely through your city. Find out more here.

Half of me is reblogging this because it is warbler migration season, and last Saturday marked the return of the weekend Bird Walk here at the Garden. It takes place every Saturday at 11 a.m., and it’s one of the best opportunities in the city to take up the birding habit and scope out species for your life list with an expert birder (Debbie Becker’s a whiz). And with newly-opened bird havens like the Native Plant Garden now available, spotting these teensy puffs of migratory color is a breeze.

The other half of me just freaking loves pixel art. Thanks goes to Ann for pointing this one out to me. —MN